Tag Archives: Lalo Schifrin

In October 1972.

In October 1972, “Philips” label released “The Moviegoer”, the seventh Scott Walker studio album. It was recorded in 1972, and was produced by Johnny Franz.

Personnel:

  • Scott Walker– vocals
  • Peter J. Olliff – engineering
  • Robert Cornford – orchestra director

Track listing:

  1. This Way Mary (Theme from Mary, Queen of Scots) – John Barry, Don Black
  2. Speak Softly Love (Love theme from The Godfather) – Nino Rota
  3. Glory Road (Theme from U.S.A.) – Neil Diamond
  4. That Night (Theme from The Fox) – Lalo Schifrin, Norman Gimbel
  5. The Summer Knows” (Theme from Summer of ’42) – Michel Legrand, Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman
  6. The Ballad of Sacco and Vanzetti (Here’s to You) (Theme from Sacco and Vanzetti) – Joan Baez, Ennio Morricone
  7. A Face in the Crowd – (Theme from Le Mans) – Bergman, Michel Legrand
  8. Joe Hill (Theme from The Ballad of Joe Hill) – Stefan Grossman
  9. Loss Of Love (Theme from Sunflower) – Henry Mancini, Bob Merrill
  10. All His Children (Theme from Never Give an Inch) – Henry Mancini, Alan Bergman, Marilyn Bergman
  11. Come Saturday Morning (Theme from Pookie) – Fred Karlin, Dory Previn
  12. Easy Come Easy Go (Theme from They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?) – Johnny Green, Edward Heyman
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In September 1964.

In September 1964, “Verve” label released “The Cat”, the sixth Jimmy Smith album for the label. It was recorded in April 1964, in Englewood, New Jersey, and was produced by Creed Taylor.

Personnel:

  • Jimmy Smith– organ
  • Ray Alonge – french horn
  • Earl Chapin
  • Bill Correa
  • Jimmy Buffington
  • Kenny Burrell– guitar
  • Don Butterfield– tuba
  • Jimmy Cleveland– trombone
  • Urbie Green
  • George Duvivier– bass
  • Bernie Glow– trumpet
  • Thad Jones
  • Jimmy Maxwell
  • Marky Markowitz
  • Ernie Royal
  • Snooky Young
  • Lalo Schifrin– arranger, conductor
  • Phil Kraus – percussion
  • Tony Studd – bass trombone
  • Grady Tate– drums

Track listing:

  1. Theme from Joy House – Lalo Schifrin
  2. The Cat” (from Joy House) – Lalo Schifrin, Rick Ward
  3. Basin Street Blues – Spencer Williams
  4. Main Title from The Carpetbaggers – Elmer Bernstein, Ray Colcord
  5. Chicago Serenade – Eddie Harris
  6. Louis Blues – W.C. Handy
  7. Delon’s Blues – Jimmy Smith
  8. Blues in the Night – Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer

On January 6, 1993.

dg

On January 6, 1993, John Birks “Dizzy” Gillespie died aged 75. Being musician, singer, composer and bandleader, he was a trumpet virtuoso and improviser, and is regarded not only as one of the greatest jazz trumpeters of all time.Together with Charlie Parker, Gillespie was major figure in the development of bebop and modern jazz. He has recorded and performed with some of the most important musicians in the jazz history, including Charlie Parker, Bud Powell, Charles Mingus, Max Roach, Stan Getz, Sonny Stit,Coleman Hawkins, Sonny Rollins,Benny Golson, Bobby Hackett, Mary Lou Williams, Willie Ruff, Dwike Mitchell, Art Blakey, Al McKibbon, Thelonious Monk, Kai Winding, Joe Turner, Roy Eldridge, Harry “Sweets” Edison, Clark Terry, Oscar Peterson, John Lewis, Hank Jones, Percy Heath, Roy Eldridge,  Machito, Benny Carter, Lalo Schifrin, Count Basie, Freddie Hubbard,  Arturo Sandoval, Phil Woods, Moe Koffman, United Nation Orchestra, Jackie McLean, Percy Heath, Ron Holloway, Ed Cherry, John Lee, Ignacio Berroa, Duke Ellington, Quincy Jones, Gene Krupa, Buddy Rich, Mike Longo, Manhattan Transfer,  Carmen McRae, Katie Bell Nubin,  Mongo Santamaria, Woody Shaw, Lillian Terry and Randy Weston.

 

On May 25, 1984.

Eric Gale

On May 25, 1984, Eric J. Gale died aged 55. Being jazz and session guitarist, as a leader he recorded twelve albums, and has performed and recorded with some of the biggest names of the music scene, including Clark Terry, Oliver Nelson, Jimmy McGriff, Benny Golson, Van Morrison, Bernard Purdie, Herbie Mann, Yusuf Lateef, Chico Hamilton, Sonny Stitt, Quincy Jones, Al Kooper, Lena Horn, Gabor Szabo, Freddie Hubbard, Dizzy Gillespie, Esther Philips, Chuck Rainey, Johnny Hammond, Stanley Turrentine,  David Newman, Hank Crawford, Grover Washington, Jr., Roberta Flack, Stanley Turrentine, Hubert Laws, Bob James, Joe Higgs, Van McCoy, Ron Carter, George Benson, Phil Upchurch, Tom Scott, Idris Muhammad, Ashford & Simpson, Cedar Walton, Stanley Turrentine, Blood, Sweat & Tears,  Paul Butterfield, Joe Cocker, Lalo Schifrin, Randy Crawford, Rainbow, Lalo Schifrin, Patti Austin, Maynard Ferguson, Ralph MacDonald, Essra Mohawk, Carla Bley, Pee Wee Ellis, Art Farmer, Tom Scott, Jeremy Steig, Joe Farrell, Kenny Loggins, David Matthews and David Ruffin.

On February 1, 2003.

Mongo Santamaria

On February 1, 2003, Ramón “Mongo” Santamaría Rodríguez died aged 85. Being  a rumba quinto master and an Afro-Cuban Latin jazz percussionist, he has perfomed and recorded with Perez Prado, Tito Puente, Cal Tjader, Fania All Stars, Dizzy Gillespie, Toots Thielemans, Lalo Schifrin and Paul Horn. His 1977 album “Amanecer” won a “Grammy” award, and his hit rendition of Herbie Hancock’s “Watermelon Man” was inducted into the “Grammy Hall of Fame” in 1998. He is composer of the jazz standard “Afro Blue”, recorded by John Coltrane among others.